In Intel’s Overclocking Lab, Engineers Extend Limits of Processor Performance

Produits Intel - mar, 14/01/2020 - 17:00

Navya Pramod, a systems engineer working in Intel’s overclocking lab in Hillsboro, Oregon, pours 196 degrees below zero Celsius (-320 F) liquid nitrogen to cool down a 9th Gen Intel Core i9-9900K processor. Extreme overclocking causes the system to rapidly heat up. Liquid nitrogen is one tool that overclocking enthusiasts use to cool their processors and achieve extreme performance.

Intel’s unlocked processors give enthusiasts and gamers the ability to overclock – or crank up the clock speed of – a processor. Intel has a dedicated team that builds and tests overclocking features to increase performance, and the company educates customers on overclocking.

More: All Intel Images | 9th Gen Intel Core i9-9900K Sets Overclocking Records | Inside Intel’s Secret Overclocking Lab: The Tools and Team Pushing CPUs to New Limits (Tom’s Hardware)

Navya Pramod, a systems engineer in Intel’s overclocking lab in Hillsboro, Oregon, pours liquid nitrogen to cool down a 9th Gen Intel Core i9-9900K processor during an overclocking demonstration in September 2019. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)
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Warning: Altering clock frequency or voltage may damage or reduce the useful life of the processor and other system components, and may reduce system stability and performance. Product warranties may not apply if the processor is operated beyond its specifications. Check with the manufacturers of systems and components for additional details.

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In the News: Mobileye’s Autonomous Industry Leadership

Produits Intel - lun, 13/01/2020 - 23:00


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Amid heavy debate about the future of autonomous vehicles (AVs), Intel’s Mobileye has maintained a clear and composed vision for the road ahead. From its early and sustained effort to deliver AV safety standards to its under-the-hood tour of its camera-only self-driving cars, the company is leading by example to deliver the transformational potential of AVs. Projecting significant and sustained revenue growth for its business over the next decade, and announcing new deals for advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) and driverless mobility-as-a-service (MaaS), Mobileye is demonstrating how its strategy is helping it achieve global scale and bringing the company closer to becoming a complete mobility provider.

More: Autonomous Driving at Intel | Mobileye News

Read on to see what experts have to say about Mobileye growing momentum and the company’s vision for realizing an AV future:

Intel’s Mobileye has a plan to dominate self-driving – and it might work (Ars Technica): “Mobileye doesn’t have Elon Musk’s star power or Google’s billions. But it has something that’s arguably even more important: a dominant position in today’s market for advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS). … In a speech at the Consumer Electronics Show, Mobileye CEO Amnon Shashua made clear just how big of a strategic advantage this is.”

Mobileye, Intel’s fastest-growing business, explains its big bet on robotaxis (ZDNet): “Two years after Intel acquired Mobileye for $15 [billion], the maker of autonomous vehicle technology is exceeding expectations. It plans to grow its business with robotaxis and data monetization.”

Self-driving supplier Mobileye on timeline, costs, regulations for autonomous vehicles roll out (CNBC): “If more cars will be autonomous, more lives would be saved. A computer will do a better job than a human, eventually,” [Shashua] said. “It will even rival the cost of public transportation. So all that we know about transportation will change if we can make it work.”

Mobileye expands its robotaxi footprint with a new deal in South Korea (TechCrunch): “Mobileye announced an agreement to test and eventually deploy a robotaxi service in Daegu City, South Korea, the latest example of the company’s strategy to expand beyond its traditional business of supplying automakers with computer vision technology that power advanced driver-assistance systems.”

Emphasis on cameras over lidar on autonomous vehicles sets Mobileye apart from competition, CEO says (Bloomberg): “I think our biggest landmark is the fact that you can have two revolutions. One revolution is lifesaving. Now the more autonomous cars on the road, the more lives [that] will be saved. And the second revolution is a revolution in transportation – the fact that you can offer mobility at prices that rival public transportation.”

Intel’s Mobileye demos autonomous car equipped only with cameras, no other sensors (Reuters): “Intel Corp released a video of its Mobileye autonomous car navigating the streets of Jerusalem for about 20 minutes with the help of 12 on-board cameras and, unusually, no other sensors.”

Watch Mobileye’s self-driving car drive through Jerusalem using only cameras (The Verge): “At the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week, [Mobileye] demonstrated how one of its autonomous test vehicles navigated the complex streets of Jerusalem using cameras only.”

Now “vidar” is a thing (Axios): “Mobileye CEO Amnon Shashua introduced auto industry followers at CES to new terminology this week: ‘Vidar’ is a computer vision system he claims can match expensive laser-based lidar solutions using only camera sensors.”

Intel grows bullish on autonomous future (Automotive News): “The company’s approach to developing both driverless and driver-assistance features is something of an outlier in the technology realm.”

Intel’s CFO talks about the AMD threat, chip profits and the future of AI (Barron’s): “Mobileye … is both about great hardware technology, but also extraordinary software. We’re investing heavily, and it’s getting adopted so rapidly, that it’s actually an attractive return in the near term and very attractive in the long term,” Intel CIO George Davis said. “If you look at the design wins in level two and level three [autonomous driving], Mobileye is leading across the world.”

The post In the News: Mobileye’s Autonomous Industry Leadership appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

Intel Appoints Archana Deskus as Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer

Produits Intel - lun, 13/01/2020 - 22:10

Intel Corporation today announced the appointment of Archana (Archie) Deskus as senior vice president and chief information officer (CIO), effective Jan. 30. Deskus will oversee Intel’s global information technology operations and report to Intel Chief Financial Officer George Davis.

“At Intel, the CIO job is critical as we expand our growth opportunity and showcase the power of IT to unleash the potential of data for our customers and across our operations,” said Bob Swan, Intel’s CEO. “Archie has deep experience and a strong track record of driving operational excellence and transformation in complex global IT environments. She will be an outstanding addition to our management team.”

“Intel is going through an exciting and historic transformation as it extends the reach and impact of information technology in an era of data,” Deskus said. “I am thrilled to join the Intel management team and to lead an extraordinarily innovative global IT group at this strategic inflection point for the technology industry.”

Deskus joins Intel from Hewlett-Packard Enterprise, where she was senior vice president and chief information officer since 2017, responsible for leading — and driving significant transformation within — its global IT operations. Since 2003 and prior to HPE, she has held CIO roles at Baker Hughes, Ingersoll Rand, Timex and United Technologies.

Deskus serves on the board of East West Bank. She is a graduate of Boston University and earned her MBA from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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Intel and AREA15 Bring Experiential Retail to Life in Las Vegas

Produits Intel - dim, 12/01/2020 - 16:30
Opening in April 2020, the AREA15 property in Las Vegas will include a flexible platform where Intel innovation will play an integral role. (Credit: The Vox Agency)
» Click for full image

What’s New: Today, Intel announced a collaboration with AREA15, one of the first purpose-built experiential retail and entertainment complexes. To thrive in the digital age, traditional retailers and malls face a reinvent-or-die reality. AREA15 is tackling this issue by offering live events, immersive experiences and activations, and monumental art installations, employing ground-breaking technology and much more for the retail environment.

“Today, only top retailers can afford to explore and implement experiential design in their stores. We believe immersive, authentically engaging and inspiring experiences in retail are not only possible, but should be accessible for all. Ecosystem collaboration is in Intel’s DNA. AREA15 will help provide scalable, world-class experiential retail solutions for retailers and brands of all sizes.”
–Joe Jensen, Intel vice president and general manager of the Retail, Banking, Hospitality and Education Division

Why It’s Important: Research shows that 81 percent of Generation Z prefer to shop in stores, and 73 percent like to discover new products in stores. This offers the opportunity to transform how a new generation of consumers chooses to interact with brands. Retailers and brands can’t afford to miss out on engaging this demographic, which is on track to become the largest generation of consumers by 2020 — responsible for $29 billion to $143 billion in direct spending.

The Intel Experience Incubation Hub will be a multiuse venue for innovation and collaboration. It will allow retail ecosystem partners to test new design concepts and technologies. (Credit: Design Distill)
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The rise of the “experience economy,” fueled by rapid shifts in technology-enabled design and culture, has resulted in the business-critical need to understand customers — not only Gen Z — and use that data to design a real-time personal experience.

Intel’s Role: The alliance will initially focus on immersive experiential retail design with the launch of the Intel© Experience Incubation Hub, a multiuse venue for innovation and collaboration. It will allow retail ecosystem partners — from creatives to technologists — to test new design concepts and leading-edge technologies.

Opening in April, the AREA15 property in Las Vegas aims to be the gravitational center for the new experience economy, building a flexible platform where Intel innovation will play an integral role. AREA15’s technical and physical infrastructure will be modular, allowing for innovations coming out of the Experience Incubation Hub to be easily tested for proof of concept and scalability — within AREA15 and beyond — in a variety of forms, from pop-ups to short-term engagements to more permanent installations.

Early collaborators and experiences featured in the Experience Incubation Hub include Artist TRAV, Papinee, Pressure Point Creative, ThenWhat Inc. and Variant.

“AREA15 is a radical reimagining of retail, where visitors can expect to be authentically engaged and inspired in an otherworldly setting,” said Winston Fisher, CEO of AREA15 and partner in Fisher Brothers. “Experience design cannot be separated from technology — it is essential that the two are intertwined and co-developed. That’s where our collaboration with Intel comes in. Together, we’re raising the standard of experience design, and developing best practices for combining technology, art and commerce in exciting, unexpected ways.”

More Context: Intel at 2020 NRF: Intel Gives Retail the Edge

The post Intel and AREA15 Bring Experiential Retail to Life in Las Vegas appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

Media Alert: Intel Customer Spotlight: The Sinclair, the First All-Digital Hotel Experience

Produits Intel - jeu, 09/01/2020 - 16:00
The Sinclair, in Fort Worth, Texas, connects everything from smart and more sustainable and efficient building operations to in-room environments to personalized experiences for its guests – all through innovative technologies. (Credit: Sinclair Holdings)

On Jan. 21, 2020, Intel will host its next customer spotlight discussion with Farukh Aslam, CEO and president of Sinclair Holdings LLC, which owns The Sinclair, Autograph Collection, the first all-digital hotel.

Farukh Aslam

The conversation will be hosted by IIoT World co-founder Lucian Fogoros. Aslam will share his vision for the hotel of the future and Sinclair Holdings’ leadership and innovation in the use of internet of things (IoT) technology to deliver exceptional services.

The Sinclair, in Fort Worth, Texas, is the first of its kind, connecting everything from smart and more sustainable and efficient building operations to in-room environments to personalized experiences for its guests – all through innovative technologies.

Aslam will speak to the use of Intel’s IoT functionality to transform The Sinclair’s operations and customer value.

What: Intel Customer Spotlight Series: The Sinclair, Autograph Collection

When: 10:15 a.m. PST, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2020

Format: A 25-minute discussion with CEO and president of Sinclair Holdings LLC., Farukh Aslam, followed by a 15-minute Q&A session for press and analysts.

RSVP:  Email IntelIOT@ogilvy.com or register at https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/17847/379115

More Customer Stories: Intel Customer Spotlight on Intel.com | Customer Stories on Intel Newsroom

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Mobileye Raises the Bar: 2020 CES Roundup

Produits Intel - mer, 08/01/2020 - 21:53

Equipped with a business strategy unlike any other automotive supplier and growth ambitions to become a complete mobility provider, Mobileye President and CEO Prof. Amnon Shashua called on the industry to be transparent with its autonomous driving technology and then showed a 23-minute unedited, uninterrupted drive of an autonomous vehicle (AV) using camera-only sensors.

More: All Mobileye and Intel News from CES 2020 | Mobileye News | Mobileye’s Computer Vision (Event Replay) | Autonomous Driving at Intel

During his annual CES address, Shashua provided an under-the-hood tour of Mobileye’s leading computer vision technology, showed how the company’s mapping strategy is helping the company achieve global scale, and introduced new deals for advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) and driverless mobility-as-a-service (Maas). Scroll down for a synopsis of Mobileye’s updates from #CES2020.

Under the Hood with Mobileye: In his annual CES address, Intel Senior Vice President and Mobileye CEO Prof. Amnon Shashua called for more transparency in technology to enable the future of autonomous driving. In front of a captivated audience in Las Vegas, Shashua went under the hood of Mobileye’s computer vision, presenting new details behind the company’s latest technology advancements to demonstrate the innovative approach it is taking to make autonomy a reality. For the first time, Shashua discussed “VIDAR,” Mobileye’s unique solution for achieving outputs akin to lidar using only camera sensors. In addition, he detailed how Mobileye achieves pixel-level scene segmentation that can be used to detect tiny fragments of road users such as wheelchairs, open vehicle doors and more, as well as the ways in which Mobileye technology turns two-dimensional sensors into 3D understanding. Highlighting the progress and purpose of Mobileye’s drive to full autonomy, Shashua’s address showcased exactly how the company will lead the industry in realizing autonomous driving. » Watch full presentation | » Download speaker presentation

Camera-Driven AV Navigates Jerusalem: Mobileye is developing two truly redundant sensing systems: one with surround-view cameras alone and the other with radars and lidars. In this unedited video demonstrating the camera-only technology in Jerusalem, you can see Mobileye’s car successfully navigate a complex driving environment heavy with pedestrians, unguarded intersections, delivery vehicles and more. This is the everyday capability of Mobileye’s technology. » Watch video on YouTube

Mobileye in Numbers: At CES 2020, Mobileye revealed new growth metrics demonstrating the continued strength of Intel’s fastest-growing business, including more than 54 million EyeQ chips shipped to date. 2019 was another record year for the company, with sales close to $1 billion driven by significant growth in the ADAS market. Mobileye’s future business is expanding greatly with forays into data monetization and the nascent robotaxi market. » Click for full-size infographic

Transportation Secretary Visits Mobileye Booth: Mobileye, an Intel company, was honored to host U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao in its booth at CES. Professor Amnon Shashua, Intel senior vice president and Mobileye president and chief executive officer, shared the company’s latest ADAS innovations, technology-neutral formal model for automated vehicle safety assurance and global MaaS industry collaborations. Intel-Mobileye commends the secretary’s release of “Automated Vehicles 4.0,” underscoring that the U.S government is “all in” on automated vehicle safety technologies. Caption: From left: Tzahi Swisa, Mobileye technical assistant; Marjorie Dickman, Intel global director and associate general counsel; Finch Fulton, U.S. deputy assistant secretary for transportation policy; Professor Amnon Shashua, Mobileye president and CEO; The Honorable Elaine Chao, U.S. secretary of transportation; Florine Berkovitch, Mobileye chief of staff; K. Jane Williams, acting administrator, U.S. Federal Transit Administration.

Mobileye Maps Las Vegas: Using its crowd-sourced Road Experience Management™ (REM™) technology, Mobileye created a demonstration high-definition map of more than 400 km (248 miles) of Las Vegas roads from over 16,000 drives. Map creation of Nevada-area roads took less than 24 hours. This map provides centimeter-level accuracy for thousands of on-road and near-road objects, including 60,000 signs, 20,000 poles and more than 1,500 km of lane centerlines. The near-real-time capability of REM coupled with the extremely low-bandwidth data upload (approximately 10 kilobits/km) from millions of Mobileye-equipped passenger cars makes this technology highly scalable and practical for both advanced ADAS (L2+) solutions and full AVs including driverless mobility-as-a-service (MaaS) fleets. » Download video: “2020 CES: Mobileye Maps Las Vegas (B-Roll)”

Mobileye in China: Mobileye announced a new agreement with SAIC, a leading Chinese OEM to use Mobileye’s REM mapping technology to map China for L2+ ADAS deployment while paving the way for autonomous vehicles in the country. The deployment of the mapping solution in China presents opportunities for additional OEM partners to enter the Chinese market with map-related features. China is the first country to benefit from the four Mobileye strategic product categories. With the addition of the SAIC agreement, Mobileye’s China footprint now includes L2+ ADAS, mapping (a first for China), MaaS and consumer AVs. Caption: Professor Amnon Shashua speaks at CES on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation) » Click for full image

Mobileye Expands Driverless to South Korea: Mobileye and the leaders of Daegu Metropolitan City, South Korea, announced an agreement to establish a long-term cooperation to test and deploy robotaxi-based mobility solutions powered by Mobileye’s autonomous vehicle technology. Mobileye will integrate its industry-leading self-driving system into vehicles to enable a driverless MaaS operation. The agreement with Daegu City, one of South Korea’s largest metropolitan areas, extends Mobileye’s global MaaS footprint. Combined with Mobileye’s previously announced robotaxi-based mobility services agreements, the new deal shows how Mobileye is quickly scaling its autonomous MaaS ambitions globally. Caption: Jack Weast, Mobileye vice president and Intel senior principal engineer, gives a tour of the Mobileye booth at CES 2020.  (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation) » Click for full image

The post Mobileye Raises the Bar: 2020 CES Roundup appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

2020 CES: How Intel AI Helps the Red Cross Generate Open Source Maps for Disaster Relief

Produits Intel - mer, 08/01/2020 - 17:00

Maps are essential tools for the disaster relief worker — for making response plans, for estimating the number of people who might need help and, of course, for navigation. Today, aid workers rely on open source digital maps — particularly in lower-income countries — built and enhanced by thousands of volunteers, and most recently, by Intel artificial intelligence (AI) technology.

But in the past, good maps were scarce. Dale Kunce, who runs the American Red Cross Cascades Region, recalls that when he would arrive in a new place hit by a disaster — an earthquake, a hurricane, a flood — one of the first things he and his teams would do was seek out that multicolored bank of tourist brochures you find in airports, each one hawking a tour or nearby attraction.

“We would pull every single one that had a map and those would be our maps for a while,” Kunce said.

Ten years ago, when the big earthquake hit Haiti, for example, the only digitally mapped feature of the capital city, Port-au-Prince, was a highway: Route Nationale #1. To help give aid workers better maps, Kunce says some 600 volunteers came together, accessed satellite imagery and started adding details to OpenStreetMap (founded in 2004, it’s like a Wikipedia for maps).

More: Intel at CES 2020 | Artificial Intelligence at Intel | The American Red Cross and Intel Use AI for Disaster Preparedness

These volunteers created “the most detailed map of Haiti in existence in just a few weeks,” the World Bank reported. “OpenStreetMap quickly became the de facto basemap for many of the organizations involved in the response and reconstruction.” This led to the formation of the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team, which subsequently helped crowdsource maps in areas struck by natural disasters, as well as the 2014 Ebola outbreak in Africa.

As the Ebola outbreak wound down, Kunce and three compatriots decided they need to fill the gaps caused by the lack of map data, which he says contributed in part to the length of the outbreak. They started Missing Maps, an effort to map the most vulnerable places in the world — within OpenStreetMap and available to anyone with an internet connection — and thus improve crisis planning and response.

“Missing Maps is trying to solve the first problem: Can we physically get to a place; do we know the roads to get there?” Kunce said. “And then, do we know how many people are there when we get there?”

“By mapping buildings, you can basically map people,” Kunce explained. It is especially important in countries lacking recent or accurate census data. “Putting a building on a map is a short circuit for years of non-investment into data.”

The mapping process itself is tedious, if simple: You load OpenStreetMap, navigate and zoom into the area you want to add detail, and start editing. In the past five years, some 2,000 Missing Maps projects have put more than 200 million people on the map, based on buildings and residential areas added to OpenStreetMap.

When Matt Beale, a product manager in Intel’s Artificial Intelligence Platforms Group, learned about all this — the criticality, the lack and the labor-intensity of good maps — two years ago through a friend at the Red Cross, he thought it was “an obvious opportunity for us to help.” Beale was then working with government and public-sector companies to implement AI. And he knew of research in Intel’s AI Platforms Group related to extracting information from satellite imagery.

Dale Kunce, co-founder of Missing Maps and CEO of American Red Cross Cascades Region, works on a map in west Africa. (Credit: Missing Maps)
» Click for full image

From a technical standpoint, this approach is “surprisingly not as solved a problem as you might think,” Beale says. Good satellite images are expensive, and differences in features like vegetation and building styles means an algorithm trained to identify details in one country or region won’t apply accurately to another.

For the project announced this week at CES, the Intel-Red Cross team decided to map bridges in Uganda, a poorly mapped African country not only vulnerable to viral outbreaks (a case of Ebola emerged in June) but also prone to severe flooding.

“Bridges are often washed out or impassable,” said the Red Cross’s Kunce. That “can mean that your 20-minute drive all of a sudden becomes several hours.”

After a mapathon effort at Intel confirmed that finding bridges manually is “really time inefficient,” Kunce said, the next problem was financing the creation of training data to feed the algorithm. Beale spent a year and a half building support and cobbling together enough money to have CrowdAI professionally map and label data for northern Uganda. “It was a matter of persistence,” he said, “but it’s been a labor of love.”

The Intel team used the clean data to build the model, which then found 70 bridges in southern Uganda previously missed in both OpenStreetMap and the official Uganda Bureau of Statistics map — in just a few hours.

Uganda’s mapping details are now noted, but there’s lots more work to do.

First on the agenda, says Beale, is to open-source the training dataset “so other researchers or folks in humanitarian mapping can use it to experiment and develop models for similar problems.”

To help accelerate that, the Intel team is planning workshops to help the mapping community get started with AI. And Intel will continue to hold on-campus mapathons, where more than 400 employees have contributed over 1,100 hours in the past year.

“People are still really important for mapping,” Beale said. “A lot of tasks are harder for a computer to do.”

Longer-term solutions, Beale explains, could span from simply adapting the model to different locales all the way to using satellite and drone images taken immediately after a disaster to update maps automatically.

But for now, “this is helping us create awesome Red Cross plans,” Kunce said.

Instead of spending time digging through tourist brochures or having community members draw maps in the dirt, Red Cross volunteers can get right to executing those plans and help people in need — faster.

More Customer Stories: Intel Customer Spotlight on Intel.com | Customer Stories on Intel Newsroom

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2020 CES: Mobileye’s Computer Vision (Replay)

Produits Intel - mar, 07/01/2020 - 23:05

Watch Prof. Amnon Shashua’s CES 2020 address highlighting the progress and purpose of Mobileye’s drive to full autonomy. He showcased new sensing technologies that culminate into a 23-minute drive on the congested streets of Jerusalem that is the basis for Mobileye’s MaaS service. Shashua showcased the uninterrupted drive as an example of transparency he feels the industry should provide to get to full autonomy. | Amnon Shashua’s Speaker Notes

» Download “2020 CES: Amnon Shashua’s ‘Under the Hood of Mobileye’s Computer Vision’ (Event Replay)”

When: 11:30 a.m. PST Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020

More Context: Intel and Mobileye at 2020 CES | Autonomous Driving at Intel | Mobileye News | Talks & Interviews: Mobileye’s Prof. Amnon Shashua

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2020 CES: Mobileye’s Global Ambitions Take Shape with New Deals in China, South Korea

Produits Intel - mar, 07/01/2020 - 21:30

What’s New: With sales close to $1 billion in 2019 and expected to rise double-digits this year, Mobileye’s global ambitions in advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous mobility-as-a-service (MaaS) came into sharper focus with two agreements announced today. SAIC, a leading Chinese OEM, plans to use Mobileye’s REM mapping technology to map China for L2+ ADAS deployment while paving the way for autonomous vehicles in the country. And the leaders of Daegu Metropolitan City, South Korea, agreed to establish a long-term cooperation to deploy MaaS based on Mobileye’s self-driving system.

“These two new agreements build our global footprint in both MaaS and ADAS and demonstrate our commitment to true global leadership toward full autonomy.”
–Prof. Amnon Shashua, Mobileye president & CEO and Intel senior vice president

Why It Matters: The two deals show how Mobileye, an Intel Company, is executing on its multiprong strategy toward full autonomy, which includes mapping, ADAS, MaaS and consumer AVs. The agreements build on other recent announcements, including: an agreement with RATP in partnership with the city of Paris to bring robotaxis to France; a collaboration with NIO to manufacture Mobileye’s self-driving system and sell consumer AVs based on that system, and to supply robotaxis exclusively to Mobileye for China and other markets; a joint venture with UniGroup in China for use of map data; and a joint venture with Volkswagen and Champion Motors to operate an autonomous ride-hailing fleet in Israel.

Based on third-party data, Mobileye estimates the autonomous MaaS total addressable market (TAM) at $160 billion by 2030. Mobileye’s ADAS leadership, uniquely scalable mapping tools and global robotaxi-based mobility ambitions have been designed to address this massive opportunity.

China is the first country to benefit from the four Mobileye strategic product categories. With the addition of the SAIC agreement, Mobileye’s China footprint now includes L2+ ADAS, mapping (a first for China), MaaS and consumer AVs.

How the SAIC Agreement Works: SAIC and Mobileye have signed an agreement to use Mobileye’s Road Experience Management™ (REM™) mapping technology on SAIC vehicles via SAIC’s licensed map subsidiary (Heading). SAIC vehicles will contribute to Mobileye’s RoadBook by gathering information on China’s roadways, creating a high-definition map of the country that can be used by vehicles with L2+ and higher levels of autonomy. The deployment of the mapping solution in China presents opportunities for additional OEM partners to enter the Chinese market with map-related features.

The SAIC agreement marks Mobileye’s first design win with a major Chinese automaker to harvest road data while also utilizing Mobileye’s REM mapping technology to enable L2+ in passenger vehicles.

SAIC joins other Mobileye OEM partners around the world in collecting road data to enable a global real-time high-definition map. It is the first Chinese OEM to use Mobileye’s REM technology to offer sharper ADAS capabilities and accelerate the development of autonomous driving in China.

How the Daegu Metropolitan City Agreement Works: Mobileye and Daegu City will collaborate to test and deploy robotaxi-based mobility solutions powered by Mobileye’s autonomous vehicle technology. Mobileye will integrate its industry-leading self-driving system into vehicles to enable a driverless MaaS operation. Daegu Metropolitan City partners will ensure the regulatory framework supports the establishment of robotaxi fleet operation.

The agreement with Daegu City, one of South Korea’s largest metropolitan areas, extends Mobileye’s global MaaS footprint. Combined with Mobileye’s previously announced robotaxi-based mobility services agreements, the new deal shows how Mobileye is quickly scaling its autonomous MaaS ambitions globally. No other MaaS provider has declared a global MaaS footprint that rivals Mobileye’s strategy and go-to-market plan.

How Mobileye’s Strategy Differs: Leaders on the road to full autonomy must successfully navigate the phases of both ADAS and MaaS before the consumer AV industry can take shape. Doing this requires a simple, scalable mapping solution, such as Mobileye’s REM. With its eye toward full autonomy, Mobileye addresses these critical aspects of the autonomous revolution.

REM technology: Because it relies on crowd sourcing and low-bandwidth uploads, Mobileye REM technology is a fast and cost-effective way to create high-definition maps that can be utilized for enhanced ADAS such as L2+, as well as higher levels of autonomy for future self-driving cars. Mobileye’s REM map data has significant value beyond the automotive industry and can bring insights to businesses in new market segments, such as smart cities. SAIC is the latest OEM to turn passenger cars into harvesting vehicles that will contribute to the global RoadBook.

Robotaxis: Mobileye’s strategy for deploying robotaxis covers the specification, development and integration of all five value layers of the robotaxi market including: self-driving systems, self-driving vehicles, fleet operations, mobility intelligence, and rider experience and services. Mobileye’s approach is cost-effective, allowing the company to scale global operations more quickly than competitors and thereby capture a greater share of the aforementioned $160 billion global robotaxi opportunity, which is a significant step on the way to the fully autonomous future. Mobileye’s unique approach of scaling globally with a more economical solution, coupled with its superior technology, enable the company to lead MaaS and consumer-AV development at scale well ahead of the market.

More Context: Autonomous Driving at Intel | Intel and Mobileye at 2020 CES | Mobileye News

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2020 CES: Unedited Ride in Mobileye’s Camera-Driven Autonomous Vehicle

Produits Intel - mar, 07/01/2020 - 19:48

Mobileye is developing two truly redundant sensing systems: one with surround-view cameras alone, and the other with radars and lidars. In this unedited demonstration of the camera-only technology in Jerusalem, you can see Mobileye’s car successfully navigating a complex driving environment rich with pedestrians, unguarded intersections, delivery vehicles and more.

During the ride, Mobileye displays additional sensing features that are not shown in the unified 3D environmental model — for the sake of reducing clutter. This under-the-hood view demonstrates the depth of Mobileye’s highly sophisticated surround sensing and RSS-enabled driving policy.

More Context: Intel and Mobileye at CES 2020 | Autonomous Driving at Intel | Mobileye News

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2020 CES: Intel News Conference – ‘Innovation through Intelligence’ (Replay)

Produits Intel - mar, 07/01/2020 - 04:45

» Download “2020 CES: Intel News Conference – ‘Innovation through Intelligence’ (Event Replay)”

Intel’s CEO Bob Swan takes the stage to open this year’s Intel CES news conference. He is joined by Client Computing Group Executive Vice President Gregory Bryant and Data Platforms Group Executive Vice President Navin Shenoy, along with several guests. They highlight how Intel is infusing intelligence across the cloud, network, edge and PC. The conference brings to life several of Intel’s latest advancements focused on creating broad positive impact for people, business and society.

When: 4 p.m. PST Monday, Jan. 6, 2020

More Context: Intel at 2020 CES

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2020 CES: Intel Brings Innovation to Life with Intelligent Tech Spanning the Cloud, Network, Edge and PC

Produits Intel - mar, 07/01/2020 - 01:45


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LAS VEGAS, Jan. 6, 2020 – Breakthroughs in artificial intelligence (AI) that pave the way for autonomous driving. A new era of mobile computing innovation. The future of immersive sports and entertainment. Intel demonstrated all of these and more today at CES 2020, showcasing how the company is infusing intelligence across the cloud, network, edge and PC, and driving positive impact for people, business and society.

Intel CEO Bob Swan kicked off today’s news conference by sharing updates from its Mobileye business, including a demonstration of its self-driving robocar navigating traffic in a natural manner. The drive demonstrated Mobileye’s unique and innovative approach to deliver safer mobility for all with a combination of artificial intelligence, computer vision, the regulatory science model of RSS and true redundancy through independent sensing systems.

Swan also highlighted Intel’s work with the American Red Cross and its Missing Maps project to improve disaster preparedness. Using integrated AI acceleration on 2nd Generation Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors, Intel is helping the American Red Cross and its Missing Maps project to build highly accurate maps with bridges and roads for remote regions of the world, which helps emergency responders in the event of a disaster.

“At Intel, our ambition is to help customers make the most of technology inflections like AI, 5G and the intelligent edge so that together we can enrich lives and shape the world for decades to come. As we highlighted today, our drive to infuse intelligence into every aspect of computing can have positive impact at unprecedented scale,” Swan said.

Intelligence-Driven Mobile Computing

Mobile computing was an area of emphasis, as Intel made announcements spanning new products, partnerships and exciting platform-level innovations that will transform the way people focus, create and engage. Intel Executive Vice President Gregory Bryant announced the following:

  • First look and demonstration of the newest Intel® Core™ mobile processors, code-named “Tiger Lake”: Tiger Lake is designed to bring Intel’s bold, people-led vision for mobile computing to life, with groundbreaking advances in every vector and experience that matters. With optimizations spanning the CPU, AI accelerators and discrete-level integrated graphics based on the new Intel Xe graphics architecture, Tiger Lake will deliver double-digit performance gains1, massive AI performance improvements, a huge leap in graphics performance and 4x the throughput of USB 3 with the new integrated Thunderbolt 4. Built on Intel’s 10nm+ process, the first Tiger Lake systems are expected to ship this year.
  • Preview of first Xe-based discrete GPU: Intel Vice President of Architecture for Graphics and Software Lisa Pearce provided insight into the progress on the new Intel Xe graphics architecture, which will provide huge performance gains in Tiger Lake, and previewed Intel’s first Xe-based discrete GPU, code-named “DG1.”
  • Significant updates on Intel’s “Project Athena” innovation program, including the first Project Athena-verified Chromebooks: Project Athena-verified designs have been tuned, tested and verified to deliver fantastic system-level innovation and benefits spanning battery life, consistent responsiveness, instant wake, application compatibility and more. Intel has verified 25 Project Athena designs to date, and Bryant announced an expanded partnership with Google that has already resulted in the first two Project Athena-verified Chromebooks, the ASUS Chromebook Flip (C436) and the Samsung Galaxy Chromebook. Intel expects to verify approximately 50 more designs across Windows and Chrome this year and deliver a target specification for dual-screen PCs.
  • Form factor innovation, including dual screens and a revolutionary foldable design: Through deepened co-engineering efforts with OEM partners, Intel helps deliver category-defining devices based on Intel Core processors. This includes new dual-screen and foldable designs like the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Fold, which leverages the Intel Core processor with Intel Hybrid Technology (code-named “Lakefield”) expected to ship midyear, and the Dell Concept Duet. Bryant also previewed Intel’s latest concept device, a foldable OLED display form factor, code-named “Horseshoe Bend.” Based on Intel’s upcoming Tiger Lake mobile processors, the design is similar in size to a 12-inch laptop with a folding touchscreen display that can be opened up to more than 17 inches.

Intelligence-Driven Business Transformation
The data center is the force that delivers intelligence to businesses around the world and Intel Xeon Scalable processors continue to be the foundation of the data center. Intel Executive Vice President Navin Shenoy announced that 3rd Generation Intel Xeon Scalable processors, coming in the first half of 2020, will include new Intel® DL Boost extensions for built-in AI training acceleration, providing up to a 60% increase in training performance over the previous family.

Shenoy highlighted several ways Intel is threading intelligence into data platforms across cloud, network and edge and how this is transforming sports and entertainment:

  • Netflix optimizes and accelerates media streaming services: Netflix has utilized the latest video compression technology, AV1, to enhance Netflix’s media streaming services and bring content to life across the globe, with up to 60% compression efficiency over the previous compression technology (AVC). Intel’s and Netflix’s joint efforts continue with the development of an open-source high-performance encoder (SVT-AV1), optimized on 2nd Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors, that delivers significant quality and performance gains making it viable for commercial deployment.
  • Enhanced athlete and viewer experiences at Tokyo 2020 with 3D Athlete Tracking: A first-of-its-kind computer vision solution, 3D Athlete Tracking (3DAT) uses AI to enhance the viewing experience with near real-time insights and visualizations. 3DAT uses highly mobile cameras to capture the form and motion of athletes, then applies algorithms optimized with Intel DL Boost and powered by Intel Xeon Scalable processors to analyze the biomechanics of athletes’ movements. Shenoy announced that this technology will enhance replays of the 100-meter and other sprinting events at the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020.
  • Large-scale volumetric video streaming: Intel and the sports industry are transforming the sports viewing experience with volumetric video, an important progression toward enabling sports viewing without limitations. Intel® True View synthesizes the entire volume of the stadiums’ field to provide endless angles that allow fans to choose any vantage point and player perspective and stream from their devices. Intel and the NFL showcased the power of streaming volumetric video with a play from Week 15’s Cleveland Browns-Arizona Cardinals game. The data produced from the first quarter of an NFL game alone reaches beyond 3TB per minute – an exponential increase requiring tremendous computing power.


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More information on all of these announcements, including visual assets from the event, is available in the CES press kit on the Intel Newsroom.

1Based on Intel testing and configurations.

Forward-Looking Statements

Statements in this news summary that refer to future plans and expectations, including with respect to Intel’s future products and the expected availability and benefits of such products, are forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Words such as “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” “goals,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates,” “continues,” “may,” “will,” “would,” “should,” “could,” and variations of such words and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. Statements that refer to or are based on estimates, forecasts, projections, uncertain events or assumptions, including statements relating to total addressable market (TAM) or market opportunity and anticipated trends in our businesses or the markets relevant to them, also identify forward-looking statements. Such statements are based on the company’s current expectations and involve many risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in these forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the company’s expectations are set forth in Intel’s earnings release dated October 25, 2018, which is included as an exhibit to Intel’s Form 8-K furnished to the SEC on such date. Additional information regarding these and other factors that could affect Intel’s results is included in Intel’s SEC filings, including the company’s most recent reports on Forms 10-K and 10-Q. Copies of Intel’s Form 10-K, 10-Q and 8-K reports may be obtained by visiting our Investor Relations website at www.intc.com or the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

Software and workloads used in performance tests may have been optimized for performance only on Intel microprocessors.

Performance tests, such as SYSmark and MobileMark, are measured using specific computer systems, components, software, operations and functions. Any change to any of those factors may cause the results to vary. You should consult other information and performance tests to assist you in fully evaluating your contemplated purchases, including the performance of that product when combined with other products. For more complete information visit www.intel.com/benchmarks.

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2020 CES: The American Red Cross and Intel Use AI for Disaster Preparedness

Produits Intel - mar, 07/01/2020 - 01:45

What’s New: The American Red Cross, its Missing Maps project and Intel are using artificial intelligence (AI) to map vulnerable populations in developing nations to aid with disaster preparedness. Throughout 2019, Intel data scientists built a computer vision model that can identify previously unmapped bridges and roads on satellite images from Uganda.

“As someone who’s been on the ground with the Red Cross, having access to accurate maps is extremely important in disaster planning and emergency response. But there are entire parts of the world that are unmapped, which makes planning and responding to disasters much more difficult. This is why we’re collaborating with Intel to use AI to map vulnerable areas and identify roads, bridges, buildings and cities.
–Dale Kunce, co-founder of Missing Maps and CEO of American Red Cross Cascades Region

Why It Matters: According to the American Red Cross and its Missing Maps project, disasters affect nearly 200 million people around the world annually. Many of the affected areas are missing from maps, which means that first responders lack necessary information to make fast decisions regarding relief efforts.

Dale Kunce, co-founder of Missing Maps and CEO of American Red Cross Cascades Region, works on a map in west Africa. (Credit: Missing Maps)
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How It Works: Satellite images can be challenging to read, and bridges and infrastructure may differ from country to country. The AI model augments mappers’ abilities to cover more ground and can catch things that may be difficult for the human eye to find. For example, the model found 70 bridges in southern Uganda that had been missed in either OpenStreetMap or the official Ugandan Bureau of Statistics map.

The computer vision model runs on 2nd Generation Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors with DL Boost and nGraph.

What’s Next: While Intel doesn’t own the complete rights to the dataset, it is exploring opportunities to open-source the dataset for researchers and the geospatial community. It will also host workshops on how to use satellite imagery and AI for humanitarian use cases, utilizing the dataset and codebase developed for this project.

More Context: Artificial Intelligence at IntelShedding Light on Under-mapped Areas with AI and the American Red Cross (Blog) | AIPG white paper

Download video: “Intel, American Red Cross Use Artificial Intelligence for Disaster Preparedness (B-Roll)

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IEEE to Define a Formal Model for Safe Automated Vehicle Decision-Making

Produits Intel - jeu, 19/12/2019 - 21:30
Jack Weast, senior principal engineer at Intel and vice president of Automated Vehicle Standards at Mobileye, speaks at the 2019 Mobileye Investor Summit. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)
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What’s New: The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) has approved a proposal to develop a standard for safety considerations in automated vehicle (AV) decision-making and named Intel Senior Principal Engineer Jack Weast to lead the workgroup. Participation in the workgroup is open to companies across the AV industry, and Weast hopes for broad industry representation. Group members will hold their first meeting in 2020’s first quarter.

“The forthcoming IEEE standard will provide a useful tool to answer the question of what it means for an AV to drive safely.”
– Jack Weast, Intel senior principal engineer

Why It Matters: Industry and regulators are struggling to agree on a method for evaluating the safety of AVs, although most people agree that standards are needed to establish regulatory thresholds for granting AVs their driver’s licenses. Multiple approaches are in development even though industry consensus is lacking.

Meanwhile, technology development is not standing still and is nearly ready. This puts pressure on regulators to create rules for operating AVs worldwide. Known for its technical depth and relative speed at standards development, IEEE expects to publish the first version of the standard within a year – an important consideration as calls for regulation increase.

“This standardization project will provide an important basis for the development of open, formal models in automated vehicle decision-making,” said Riccardo Mariani, vice president of Standards Activities at IEEE Computer Society. “Redundancy and diversity are crucial to developing scalable frameworks for safe automated driving.”

How It Works: The new standard – IEEE 2846 – will establish a formal rules-based mathematical model for automated vehicle decision-making that will be formally verifiable (with math), technology neutral (meaning anybody can apply it) and adjustable to allow for regional customization by local governments. It will also include a test methodology and tools necessary to perform verification of an AV to assess conformance with the standard.

Who Is Involved: Two IEEE committees co-sponsored the proposal: The IEEE Computer Society and the Vehicle Technology Society. Weast will chair the workgroup, which Weast says is open to “anyone with an interest in crafting this essential AV standard.”

Intel’s Role: Intel will bring its Responsibility-Sensitive Safety (RSS) framework as a starting point for the industry to align on what it means for an AV to drive safely. Open and technology-neutral, RSS defines what it means for a machine to drive safely with a set of logically provable rules and prescribed proper responses to dangerous situations. It formalizes human notions of safe driving in mathematical formulas that are transparent and verifiable.

Why It’s Needed: The IEEE standard is needed because the decision-making capability of an AV’s computer is mostly hidden from observation. This capability is largely driven by a collection of artificial intelligence algorithms – a “black box” of sorts – that is at the heart of important intellectual property from the leading companies in the AV industry. The black-box nature of an AV’s driving policy makes it nearly impossible to comparatively judge the safety of the different vehicles. As some industry experts have said, statistical evidence – such as number of miles driven, frequency of human intervention or hours in simulation – can only go so far before the car gets into a scenario it’s never seen before.

More Context: Autonomous Driving at Intel

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2019 Yearbook: Intel Powers the Future

Produits Intel - jeu, 19/12/2019 - 20:00

Intel’s 2019 yearbook offers a quick look back at a memorable year. 2019 started with a new chief executive officer and the momentum only increased up with a stream of notable introductions: new products, groundbreaking technology and unique customer use cases.

This yearbook reflects on 2019 highlights, but Intel’s leaders are firmly focused on 2020. In only a few weeks at CES, they will demonstrate several of Intel’s latest advancements focused on creating broad positive impact for people, businesses and society as a whole.

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Media Alert: CES 2020: Intel Highlights Positive Global Impact in AI, Autonomous Driving and Intelligence-driven Computing

Produits Intel - jeu, 19/12/2019 - 17:00
From left: Bob Swan, Gregory Bryant, Navin Shenoy (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Intel has a long heritage of creating technology that serves nearly every person on Earth every day. At CES 2020, the company will demonstrate several of its latest advancements focused on creating broad positive impact for people, businesses and society as a whole.

Intel News Conference – “Innovation through Intelligence”

This year, Intel’s CES news conference will feature Intel CEO Bob Swan, Client Computing Group Executive Vice President Gregory Bryant and Data Platforms Group Executive Vice President Navin Shenoy, along with several special guests. During an action-packed 45 minutes, Intel will highlight how it is infusing intelligence across the cloud, the network, the edge and everything in between – opening a world of opportunity and innovation for customers and partners.

Please note, there is limited seating. Doors open to media and analysts at 3:30 p.m. PST.

Where: Mandalay Bay South Convention Center, Level 2, Ballrooms E & F When: Jan. 6, 2020, 4 – 4:45 p.m. PST Livestream: Watch on the Intel Newsroom

 

Mobileye Media & Customer Conference – “An Hour with Amnon”

A future with fewer crashes and mobility for all. Intel and Mobileye see it as a moral imperative to deliver the technology that will make these possible. Join Mobileye CEO Prof. Amnon Shashua as he connects today’s technology to tomorrow’s vision. He will advance the discussion on breakthrough developments in advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) that are the building blocks for the future of autonomous driving. Shashua will address Mobileye’s industry-leading assets in computer vision, mapping and safety. He also will provide the latest on the company’s global robotaxi plans, strategic new business wins and partnerships.

Where: Las Vegas Convention Center, Room S228 When: Jan. 7, 2020, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. PST Livestream: Watch on the Intel Newsroom

 

Visit Mobileye and Intel in the Las Vegas Convention Center North Hall (Booth #7506)

Stop by the booth for an up-close look at how Mobileye’s technology will impact people and society. If you ever wished you had X-ray vision and could see inside the workings of an automated vehicle, now is your chance to access a purpose-built see-through car, along with hands-on demonstrations, an up-close look at production ADAS from Mobileye’s ecosystem, spotlights and plenty of video explainers.

Where: Las Vegas Convention Center, North Hall, Booth #7506 When: Jan. 7, 2020, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. PST Jan. 8 and Jan. 9, 2020, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. PST Jan 10, 2020, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. PST

 

Can’t make it to CES 2020?

Visit our newsroom at newsroom.intel.com/2020-CES and follow us on Twitter at @IntelNews and @Intel, and on Facebook.

Media Contacts

Farm Saechou
(916) 377-9577
farm.p.saechou@intel.com

Danielle Mann (for Mobileye)
(973) 997-1154
danielle.mann@intel.com

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How Real-Time Tracking with IoT Keeps Your Food Safer and Fresher

Produits Intel - mer, 18/12/2019 - 17:00
Intel Internet of Things Group’s Laura Rumbel stands beside sensor tags and gateway hardware. They pair to pallet IDs for monitoring shipments of goods ranging from blueberries to electronics. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)
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The Future of IoT in Keeping Food Fresh: Laura Rumbel, Consumer Experience Enabling Director in Intel’s Internet of Things Group, Explains How IoT Reduces Food Supply Waste and Theft, and Helps Combat Foodborne Illness

Our expert: Laura Rumbel works with Intel’s customers to make IoT-based supply chain solutions that provide real-time data. That data allows enterprises to make decisions as food shipments are in transit and better predict the future needs of their supply chain.

Her simple explanation of IoT’s promise in the food supply chain: Every year $400 billion of food in production never reaches consumers, according to Bloomberg. “There is a major disparity between the amount of food that’s never consumed versus the number of hungry people worldwide,” Rumbel says. “This is where IoT comes into play.”

More: See all of the Future of Technology series | Internet of Things News

The power of data: Intel recently partnered with a produce distributor to help maximize efficiency and create less waste by tracking blueberries from harvest to the distribution center. Intel’s IoT-based sensors tracked the berries’ temperature, humidity, shock (which monitors damage, like being dropped) and changes in light (which indicate a pallet is being tampered with). Even a slight change in temperature can significantly affect the quality of the fruit. “Instead of berries going to waste if they are overripe, they can be sent to a consumer that can use the berries to make juice,” Laura says. Real-time data allows these decisions to be made quickly, before the berries spoil — ultimately saving time and money, and protecting consumers’ health.

Safety is key: Another benefit of IoT in the food supply chain is the early identification of foodborne illness. Outbreaks affect individuals and the entire industry. Not only are people getting sick, but others hear about the outbreak and stop buying the product altogether — even though the contaminant is coming from a particular source, not the industry at large. However, it can take a lot of valuable time and energy to track down a foodborne illness’ origin. “If you use the sensors to tag your produce from the lot where it was harvested and follow that all the way through to the store where it was purchased, that’s where you’re golden,” Laura explains. “Because if that product is tagged and it’s sitting in a distribution center, or even if it goes all the way through to the store — say it’s recalled in a listeria-like situation — you immediately know. You have all the data that you need in the cloud.”

Saving food and stopping thieves: Real-time data can also help enterprises provide a safer environment for drivers transporting goods and for the goods themselves. Theft is a major risk facing the supply chain industry, with $33 million worth of goods stolen from cargo in 2018 alone, according to the FBI. In response, Intel created the Castle Canyon Mobile Platform, which uses a light sensor to help identify cases of theft in real-time. For example, if a pallet is being tampered with, the sensors will detect the abnormal activity and immediately notify staff, who can then alert the driver and potentially local law enforcement.

Future-focused: Though the uses of IoT sensors and tracking software are currently focused on enterprises, Laura believes they have the potential to revolutionize consumers’ purchasing decisions by allowing them to trace their products through the entire supply chain. “Retailers are trying to grapple with the power of the consumer because ultimately consumers care more than ever before about the ethics and sustainability of products,” Laura says. “Consumers want to make their own decisions; they want access to the data.” But, she points out, it’s important for the data to be broken down and contextualized for the consumer to make meaning of the raw data. Informed consumers will be able to decide whether the product aligns with their values — which can reinforce trust with consumers of that brand.

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Intel Announces Expanded Paid Leave Benefits

Produits Intel - mar, 17/12/2019 - 16:00

What’s New: Beginning Jan. 1, 2020, Intel is expanding U.S. paid leave benefits to better support employees during life’s critical moments. These changes are part of Intel’s holistic, comprehensive and inclusive benefit offerings.

“When our employees and their families are supported, they perform at their best. We strive to care for our employees and their families through every stage of life, whether they are caring for small children, aging parents or anyone in between. We want our employees to know we are here to support them through all the situations they and their families may encounter.”
–Julie Ann Overcash, Intel vice president of Human Resources and global director of Compensation and Benefits

What Expanded Benefits will Include:

  • New paid family leave: Paid leave for up to eight weeks to care for a seriously ill family member.
  • Expanded paid bonding leave: Bonding leave for new parents expanded from eight to 12 weeks.
  • New parent reintegration program: New parents may work a part-time schedule (up to four weeks) with full-time pay. Parents who opt-in will also receive a gift in celebration of the event. Intel will also provide breast milk shipping at no cost.
  • Expanded bereavement time: Paid time off for bereavement expands to up to two weeks.
  • Short-term disability coverage: The benefit, which includes pregnancy, approximates regular pay for up to 52 weeks and will be provided at no cost.

Why It Matters: These enhancements are part of Intel’s continued investment in benefits to support employee well-being. By enhancing its paid leave benefits, Intel allows employees to focus on their families and loved ones in times of need so they can return to work with the proper support. This makes Intel a better place to work for everyone.

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Intel Acquires Artificial Intelligence Chipmaker Habana Labs

Produits Intel - lun, 16/12/2019 - 15:00

SANTA CLARA Calif., Dec. 16, 2019 – Intel Corporation today announced that it has acquired Habana Labs, an Israel-based developer of programmable deep learning accelerators for the data center for approximately $2 billion. The combination strengthens Intel’s artificial intelligence (AI) portfolio and accelerates its efforts in the nascent, fast-growing AI silicon market, which Intel expects to be greater than $25 billion by 20241.

“This acquisition advances our AI strategy, which is to provide customers with solutions to fit every performance need – from the intelligent edge to the data center,” said Navin Shenoy, executive vice president and general manager of the Data Platforms Group at Intel. “More specifically, Habana turbo-charges our AI offerings for the data center with a high-performance training processor family and a standards-based programming environment to address evolving AI workloads.”

More: Artificial Intelligence at Intel

Intel’s AI strategy is grounded in the belief that harnessing the power of AI to improve business outcomes requires a broad mix of technology – hardware and software – and full ecosystem support. Today, Intel AI solutions are helping customers turn data into business value and driving meaningful revenue for the company. In 2019, Intel expects to generate over $3.5 billion in AI-driven revenue, up more than 20 percent year-over-year. Together, Intel and Habana can accelerate the delivery of best-in-class AI products for the data center, addressing customers’ evolving needs.

Shenoy continued: “We know that customers are looking for ease of programmability with purpose-built AI solutions, as well as superior, scalable performance on a wide variety of workloads and neural network topologies. That’s why we’re thrilled to have an AI team of Habana’s caliber with a proven track record of execution joining Intel. Our combined IP and expertise will deliver unmatched computing performance and efficiency for AI workloads in the data center.”

Habana Labs chairman Avigdor Willenz stands near a rack that incorporates Habana Labs’ HLS-1 Gaudi artificial intelligence training system at Habana Labs’ office in Caesarea, Israel. Willenz will serve as a senior adviser to the business unit as well as to Intel Corporation after Intel’s purchase of Habana. (Credit: Eyal Toueg/Intel Corporation)

Habana will remain an independent business unit and will continue to be led by its current management team. Habana will report to Intel’s Data Platforms Group, home to Intel’s broad portfolio of data center class AI technologies. This combination gives Habana access to Intel AI capabilities, including significant resources built over the last three years with deep expertise in AI software, algorithms and research that will help Habana scale and accelerate.

Habana chairman Avigdor Willenz has agreed to serve as a senior adviser to the business unit as well as to Intel. Habana will continue to be based in Israel where Intel also has a significant presence and long history of investment. Prior to this transaction, Intel Capital was an investor in Habana.

“We have been fortunate to get to know and collaborate with Intel given its investment in Habana, and we’re thrilled to be officially joining the team,” said David Dahan, CEO of Habana. “Intel has created a world-class AI team and capability. We are excited to partner with Intel to accelerate and scale our business. Together, we will deliver our customers more AI innovation, faster.”

Going forward, Intel plans to take full advantage of its growing portfolio of AI technology and talent to deliver customers unmatched computing performance and efficiency for AI workloads.

Habana’s AI Training and Inference Products

Habana’s Gaudi AI Training Processor is currently sampling with select hyperscale customers. Large-node training systems based on Gaudi are expected to deliver up to a 4x increase in throughput versus systems built with the equivalent number of GPUs. Gaudi is designed for efficient and flexible system scale-up and scale-out.

Additionally, Habana’s Goya AI Inference Processor, which is commercially available, has demonstrated excellent inference performance including throughput and real-time latency in a highly competitive power envelope. Gaudi for training and Goya for inference offer a rich, easy-to-program development environment to help customers deploy and differentiate their solutions as AI workloads continue to evolve with growing demands on compute, memory and connectivity.

1Intel estimates the total addressable market (TAM) for AI silicon by 2024 will be greater than $25 billion, and within that, AI silicon in the data center is expected to be greater than $10 billion in the same timeframe.

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Intel Research Identifies Digital Skills Gap Slowing Industry 4.0

Produits Intel - jeu, 12/12/2019 - 16:00
“Accelerate Industrial” was conducted and authored by Dr. Faith McCreary (right), a principal engineer, experience architect and researcher at Intel, in tandem with Dr. Irene Petrick, senior director of Industrial Innovation for Intel’s Industrial Solutions Division. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

What’s New: Intel released the results of a new study today, “Accelerate Industrial,” that represents the most comprehensive view of Industry 4.0, the digital transformation of the manufacturing sector. The research uncovered a serious skills gap that most Western industrial production training programs and government investment initiatives fail to address.

The study found that today’s leaders need to create tomorrow’s future-ready workforce. This requires the collaboration of universities, government and industry – including initiatives that focus on worker training for the transforming manufacturing sector.

Why It’s Important: A recent Deloitte/Manufacturing Institute study suggests that industries are entering a period of acute long-term labor shortages, with a shortfall in manufacturing expected to be 2.4 million job openings unfilled by 2028, resulting in a $2.5 trillion negative impact on the U.S. economy. Germany and Japan, two other developed economies, are expected to fare even worse in terms of this projected labor shortage.

What the Study Shows: With the increasing proliferation of data, connectivity and processing power at the edge, the industrial internet of things is becoming more accessible. However, successful adoption remains out of reach for many: two of three companies piloting digital manufacturing solutions fail to move into large-scale rollout.

The study uncovered the top five challenges cited by respondents that have the potential to derail investments in smart solutions in the future:

  • 36% cite “technical skill gaps” that prevent them from benefiting from their investment.
  • 27% cite “data sensitivity” from increasing concerns over data and IP privacy, ownership and management.
  • 23% say they lack interoperability between protocols, components, products and systems.
  • 22% cite security threats, both in terms of current and emerging vulnerabilities in the factory.
  • 18% reference handling data growth in amount and velocity, as well as sense-making.

What to Take From the Research: “Accelerate Industrial” points to the rising importance of the digital skills required to navigate and succeed in this new landscape.

The research found that while there is a big appetite for digital transformation – 83% of companies plan to make investments in smart factory technologies – the most important skills and characteristics cited for that transformation are not ones that are typically emphasized by most industry job training programs or relevant policymakers.

Future skills cited by respondents point to the need to go beyond the basics of programming to embrace a deep understanding of digital tools, from data collection to analytics and real-time feedback directly to the operating environment. The top five future skills required to support digital transformation in manufacturing are:

  • “Deep understanding” of modern programming or software engineering techniques
  • “Digital dexterity,” or the ability to leverage existing and emerging technologies for practical business outcomes
  • Data science
  • Connectivity
  • Cybersecurity

More Context: “Accelerate Industrial” was conducted and authored by Dr. Faith McCreary, a principal engineer, experience architect and researcher at Intel, in tandem with Dr. Irene Petrick, senior director of Industrial Innovation for Intel’s Industrial Solutions Division. The study encompasses mobile ethnographies and interviews with over 400 manufacturers and the ecosystem technologists that support them. The work is being released as a series of reports.

Even More Context: Intel.com’s Industrial Internet of Things Website | 2018 Intel Study: Intel Study Discovers Why So Many Factories are Still Operating in the 20th Century | Intel Innovators: Making Factories Better Places for Humans to Work | Internet of Things News

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